Manhattan Theater

1
Palace Theater, Midtown
Broadway and 47th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.palacetheaternewyork.com/
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The Palace Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1564 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.<br> Designed by architects Kirchoff & Rose, the theatre, built by California vaudeville entrepreneur and Broadway impresario Martin Beck, experienced a number of problems before it opened. E. F. Albee, one of the main executives for B. F. Keith and his powerful vaudeville circuit, demanded that Beck turn over three-quarters of the stock in the theatre in order to use acts from the Keith circuit. In addition, Oscar Hammerstein was the only person who could offer Keith acts in that section of Broadway, so Beck paid him off with $225,000. The theatre finally opened on March 24, 1913 with headliner Ed Wynn. To "play the Palace" meant that an entertainer had reached the pinnacle of his career, and it became a popular venue with performers like Sarah Bernhardt, Eddie Cantor, Bob Hope, Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker, George Jessel, and Jack Benny. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
2
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, Midtown
236 West 45th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.shubertorganization.com/theatres/gerald_schoenfeld.asp
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The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 236 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.<br> Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-1918, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors like John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette and Estelle Winwood.<br> After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theater returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York City landmark in 1987. The 1,080-seat house was renamed for Gerald Schoenfeld, chairman of the Shubert Organization, in 2005. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
3
Laura Pels Theatre, Midtown
111 West 46th Street - New York, NY   10036
http://www.roundabouttheatre.org/pels/
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Lanford Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy Talley’s Folly returns in a joyful and moving new production starring Tony Award® nominee Danny Burstein (Golden Boy, Follies) and Emmy® and Golden Globe® nominee Sarah Paulson (“American Horror Story,” Roundabout’s Crimes of the Heart).<br/> At the end of World War II, Matt Friedman, a Jewish immigrant who has spent his life keeping others at a distance, returns to the small town where he first met Sally Talley. Nothing like her conservative Protestant family and neighbors, Sally is a nurse with deep misgivings about the country’s future. After a lifetime of believing they’ll never truly belong in the world around them, Matt has worked up the courage to ask Sally for her hand, and convince her that they do belong—together.<br/> Michael Wilson (The Best Man, Roundabout’s The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore) directs this funny and heart-warming play about finding love when you’ve nearly given up looking.<br/> Performances begin on February 8, 2013 with an Opening Night of March 5, 2013 at the Laura Pels Theatre in the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre (111 West 46th Street). This is a limited engagement through April 28, 2013.
4
Belasco Theatre, Midtown
111 West 44th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.DisneyOnBroadway.com
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The Belasco Theatre is a legitmate Broadway theatre located at 111 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan.<br> Designed by architect George Keister for impresario David Belasco, the interior featured Tiffany lighting and ceiling panels, rich woodwork and expansive murals, and a ten-room duplex penthouse apartment that Belasco utilized as combination living quarters/office space. <br>Technically it was outfitted with the most advanced stagecraft tools available, including extensive lighting rigs, a hydraulics system, and vast wing and fly space.<br> It opened as the Stuyvesant Theatre on October 16, 1907 with the musical A Grand Army Man with Antoinette Perry. Three years later Belasco attached his own name to the venue. After his death in 1931, it was leased first by actress Katharine Cornell and then playwright Elmer Rice. The Shuberts bought it in 1949 and leased it to NBC for three years before returning it to legitimate use.<br> This theater is the subject of an urban legend that David Belasco's ghost haunts the theater every night. Some performers in the shows that played there have even claimed to have spotted him or other ghosts during performances. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
5
Vivian Beaumont Theater, Upper West Side
150 West 65th Street  - (at Lincoln Center) - New York, NY   10023
http://www.lct.org/calendar/venue.cfm?ID_venue=39925988
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The Vivian Beaumont Theater is a theater in New York City in the United States. It is located at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th Street, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It was designed by the renowned Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen. Although it was built for the presentation of plays such as those produced on Broadway, it differs from traditional Broadway theaters because of its amphitheater configuration and thrust stage. The building includes two auditoriums, the 1,080-seat Vivian Beaumont Theater and the 299-seat Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater (called The Forum until 1973). The Beaumont is considered a fairly large theater for dramatic plays and a medium-size theater for musicals. It is New York's only Broadway-class theater (eligible for Tony Awards) that is not located in the Theater District near Times Square. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
6
Music Box Teatre, Midtown
239 West 45th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.shubertorganization.com/theatres/music_box.asp
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The Music Box Theater is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 239 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. <br> The most aptly named theater on Broadway, the intimate Music Box was designed by architect C. Howard Crane and constructed by composer Irving Berlin and producer Sam H. Harris specifically to house Berlin's famed Music Box Revues. It opened in 1921 and hosted a new musical production every year until 1925, when it presented its first play, Cradle Snatchers, starring Humphrey Bogart. The following year, Chicago, the Maurine Dallas Watkins play that served as the basis for the hit musical, opened here. It housed a string of hits for the playwriting team of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, from their first collaboration Once in a Lifetime to their smash hit The Man Who Came to Dinner. Cole Porter and George and Ira Gershwin also presented shows here. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
7
Lyceum Theatre, Midtown
149 West 45th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.shubertorganization.com/theatres/lyceum.asp
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The Lyceum Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 149 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.<br> It has the distinction of being the oldest surviving Broadway venue (along with the New Amsterdam Theatre), the oldest continuously operating legitimate theatre in New York City, and the first Broadway theatre ever to be granted landmark status. It is one of the few theatres in New York to operate under its original name.<br> The theatre maintains most of its original Beaux-Arts design, including its elaborate marble staircases and undulating marquee. Although it has three levels, it is one of the smallest Broadway theatres in terms of capacity, seating only 950. An apartment located above the orchestra, originally used by Frohman, is now the headquarters of the Shubert Archives. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
8
Apollo Theater, Harlem+
253 West 125th Street  - Harlem - New York, NY   10027
     
http://www.apollotheater.org/
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Yesterday…A place where thousands of young artists have stepped out into the spotlight and launched their careers. A place "where stars are born and legends are made." The legendary Apollo Theater is so much more than an historic landmark - it is a source of pride and a symbol of the brilliance of American artistic achievement. From 1934 when the Apollo first introduced its world-famous Amateur Night which launched the careers of legendary artists like Ella Fitzgerald, James Brown, Michael Jackson, D'Angelo and Lauryn Hill, the Apollo has maintained its position as the nation's most popular arena for emerging and established black and Latino performers.
9
Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Midtown
242 West 45th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.shubertorganization.com/theatres/bernard_b_jacobs.asp
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The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.<br> Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. John Golden leased and renamed the theatre for himself from 1932 to 1937, when the Shubert Organization assumed ownership and leased the theater to CBS Radio until 1940, when it was restored to its original use and name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
10
Neil Simon Teatre, Midtown
250 West 52nd Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://neilsimontheatre.com/
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Since 1927, this theatre was known as the Alvin. It was renamed in 1983 to honor America’s most prolific playwright, Neil Simon, following the successful engagement of Brighton Beach Memoirs, the first play of an autobiographical trilogy about his youth with his family. Fittingly, in 1985, the second play of Mr. Simon’s trilogy, Biloxi Blues played there successfully. In 1992, Mr. Simon returned again with his play, Jake’s Women. <br> Since 2000, the Neil Simon has been filled with music and dancing as the home to two of Broadway’s most popular productions, namely the acclaimed revival of The Music Man and, currently, the Tony Award®-winning Best Musical, Hairspray. <br> The Neil Simon Theatre has 1,445 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.
11
Booth Theatre, Midtown
222 West 45th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.shubertorganization.com/theatres/booth.asp
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The Booth Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York City.<br> The venue was the second New York City theatre to bear this name. The first was built by Booth himself in 1869 on the corner of 23rd Street and 6th Avenue.<br> The Booth Theatre appeared in the West Wing episode Posse Comitatus. It hosted a fictitous charity performance of War of the Roses which an equally fictitious President Bartlett attended while pondering the planned assassination of the Quamari Defence Minister. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
12
American Airlines Theatre, Midtown
227 West 42nd Street - New York, NY   10036
     
http://www.roundabouttheatre.org/Your-Visit/Venues---Theatres/American-Airlines-Theatre.aspx

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A permanent home has long been a dream for the Roundabout Theatre Company. Since its establishment in 1965, Roundabout had moved from location to location, always searching for the next stop in what seemed to be a never-ending journey for permanency. From West 26th Street to West 23rd Street, from East 17th Street at Union Square then on to the Criterion Center, Roundabout seemed destined to live up to its name far too literally. All that changed in 1997, when The New 42nd Street Development project, backed by the City and State of New York, offered the historic Selwyn Theatre to Roundabout.
13
Beacon Theatre, Upper West Side
2124 Broadway - New York, NY   10023
   
http://www.beacontheatre.com

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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, Lynyrd Skynyrd continues to make music and rock stages. Don't miss this legendary band at The Beacon Theatre on January 15!<br/> The Beacon Theatre is the "older sister" to Radio City Music Hall. Both legendary venues were the "brainchild" of Samuel "Roxy" Rothafel, the great theatrical impresario and visionary of his time.
14
Studio 54, Midtown
254 West 54th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
 
http://www.roundabouttheatre.org/54/

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Now there are more chances to vote for who murdered Edwin Drood! The delightful and rollicking musical smash where the ending is entirely up to you—back on Broadway for the first time since winning the Tony® “Triple Crown” (Best Musical, Best Book, and Best Score)—has been extended through March 10, 2013.<br/> Stephanie J. Block (Anything Goes), Will Chase (“Smash”), Tony Award® nominee Gregg Edelman (Wonderful Town), Tony winner Jim Norton (The Seafarer), and Tony winner Chita Rivera (Nine) star in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, the delightful musical smash from Tony-winning writer/composer Rupert Holmes (Curtains). Tony nominee Scott Ellis (She Loves Me) directs this show’s first-ever return to Broadway since winning the Tony “Triple Crown” (Best Musical, Best Book, and Best Score)!<br/> Take a trip back in time to a Victorian music hall where a rowdy ensemble of actors mounts a staging of Charles Dickens’ unfinished novel. Everyone on stage is a suspect in the murder of young Edwin Drood, and it’s up to you to choose the killer! Is it John Jasper, Edwin’s protective but slightly maniacal uncle? Rosa Bud, his reluctant betrothed? The debauched Princess Puffer? Each performance ends differently, depending on what the audience decides!<br/> Don’t miss this rollicking play-within-a-musical that The New York Times has called “ingenious.” Come help solve The Mystery of Edwin Drood!
15
Manhattan Center, Midtown
311 West 34th Street  - The Hammerstein, The Grand - New York, NY   10001
 
http://www.mcstudios.com

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Home to two of Manhattan’s most unique event spaces. The Hammerstein and The Grand offer an elegant setting for events of all kinds. With in-house recording studios, television studios and video post production facilities, the Manhattan Center has what it takes to make your next event a complete multimedia experience.<br> Located at 311 West 34th Street, the historic Manhattan Center building still stands over 100 years after it was first built as the Manhattan Opera House by Oscar Hammerstein I in 1906. Hammerstein built the opera house with the bold intention to take on the established Metropolitan Opera by featuring cheaper seats for the ordinary New Yorker. The Manhattan Opera house quickly became an alternative venue for many great operas and celebrated singers to make their debut.
16
St. James Theatre, Midtown
246 West 44th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.stjames-theater.com/
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Grammy® Award-winning superstar Barry Manilow returns to the Broadway stage for the first time in more than two decades! Don't miss this unprecedented limited engagement as one of our most beloved entertainers performs songs from his massive catalog of hits in an intimate setting at the St. James Theatre on Broadway. From “Mandy” to "I Write the Songs" to "Copacabana (At The Copa)" and so many more, Manilow’s new Broadway show is destined to be as legendary as the man himself.<br/> The St. James Theatre is located at 246 W. 44th St. Broadway, New York City, New York. It was built by Abraham L. Erlanger, theatrical producer and a founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, on the site of the original Sardi's restaurant. It opened in 1927 as The Erlanger. Upon Erlanger's death in 1930, control of the venue was taken over by the Astor family, who owned the land on which the theatre stood. The Astors renamed it the St. James Theatre. <br> The theatre was purchased by the Shuberts in the late 1930s. They were forced to sell it to the William L. McKnight in 1957 following the loss of an antitrust case. McKnight renovated the St. James and reopened it in 1958. In 1970, McKnight then transferred the theatre to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger, who had formed the Jujamcyn Amusement Corporation. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
17
Walter Kerr Theatre, Midtown
218 West 48th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.walterkerrtheatre.com/
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The Heiress is the story of Catherine Sloper, the shy and sheltered daughter of a prominent New Yorker. Caught between the demands of an emotionally distant father and the attentions of a passionate young suitor, Catherine must navigate the terrain of love and regret, desire and duty, a chance for happiness and the burden of fortune…as only an heiress can.<br/> The timeless New York story of society, status and the true cost of love. Jessica Chastain (Academy Award® nominee for The Help) makes her Broadway debut alongside David Strathairn (Academy Award® nominee for Good Night, and Good Luck), Dan Stevens (Matthew Crawley on Downton Abbey) and Judith Ivey (two-time Tony Award® winner), in the Tony Award®-winning play, The Heiress. Written by Ruth and Augustus Goetz and directed by Tony Award® nominated playwright and director Moisés Kaufman, this compelling drama will run for an 18-week limited engagement.
18
Vineyard Theatre, Greenwich Village+
108 East 15th Street - New York, NY   10003
     
http://www.vineyardtheatre.org/

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NEW YORK PREMIERE: THE NORTH POOL By RAJIV JOSEPH and Directed by GIOVANNA SARDELLI. FEB 14 - MAR 24. In this riveting psychological thriller, a high school vice principal and a Middle Eastern-born transfer student engage in a politically and emotionally charged game of cat and mouse, with dangerous consequences. A powerful new play from Pulitzer Prize finalist Rajiv Joseph, author of Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, and recipient of The Vineyard’s Paula Vogel Playwriting Award. <br/> Vineyard Theatreis a non-profit theatre company dedicated to new work, bold programming and the support of artists. One of America’s preeminent centers for the creation of new plays and musicals, Vineyard Theatre has consistently premiered provocative, groundbreaking works by both new and established writers.
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Shubert Theatre, Midtown
225 West 44th Street  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10036
http://www.shubertorganization.com/theatres/shubert.asp
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The Shubert Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 225 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York, United States. <br> Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. It opened on October 21, 1913 with a series of Shakespearean plays, including Othello, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, staged by the Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company. <br> The theatre's most famous and longest tenant was A Chorus Line, with a run of 6137 performances lasting nearly fifteen years. <br> The top floor of the building houses the offices of the Shubert Organization. The theatre's auditorium and murals were restored in 1996. It has been designated a New York City landmark. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org" target="new">Source</a>
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Broadway Theatre, Midtown
1681 Broadway  - Theatre District - New York, NY   10019
http://www.shubertorganization.com/theatres/broadway.asp
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Coming up: Rodgers And Hammerstein's Cinderella. Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is coming to Broadway for the first time ever! Four-time Tony Award nominee Douglas Carter Beane’s (Sister Act, Xanadu) delightfully romantic and hilarious take on the ultimate makeover story features all the classic elements you remember—the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more—plus some surprising new twists! Rediscover some of Rodgers + Hammerstein's most beloved songs, including “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It’s Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago" in this outrageously fun Broadway musical for dreamers of all ages. And not to worry... you'll be home well before the stroke of midnight!<br/> The Broadway Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1681 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.<br> Designed by architect Eugene DeRosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day 1924 as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. It was re-named Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930 . (In 1937, known as Ciné Roma, it showed Italian films). The Shuberts bought it in 1939. It was renovated extensively in 1956 and 1986. The large stage (nearly sixty feet deep) and seating capacity (1761) have made it a popular theatre for musicals throughout the years.