Northeast USA Theater

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Vivian Beaumont Theater, New York State

  150 West 65th Street - (at Lincoln Center) - New York, NY              
The Vivian Beaumont Theater is a theater in New York City in the United States. It is located at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th Street, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It was designed by the renowned Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen. Although it was built for the presentation of plays such as those produced on Broadway, it differs from traditional Broadway theaters because of its amphitheater configuration and thrust stage. The building includes two auditoriums, the 1,080-seat Vivian Beaumont Theater and the 299-seat Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater (called The Forum until 1973). The Beaumont is considered a fairly large theater for dramatic plays and a medium-size theater for musicals. It is New York's only Broadway-class theater (eligible for Tony Awards) that is not located in the Theater District near Times Square. Source
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New Amsterdam Theatre, New York State
  Broadway & 42nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Based on P.I. Travers cherished stories and the classic 1964 Walt Disney film, Mary Poppins features the Sherman brothers original Academy Award-winning songs. The show has been created, in collaboration with Cameron Mackintosh, by Academy Award-winning screenwriter Julian Fellowes, who has written the book, and the Olivier Award-winning team of George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, who have composed new songs and additional music and lyrics.
Olivier Award-winning director Richard Lyre leads a dream team of vision and stagecraft bringing to life the story of the Banks family and their magical nanny. Co-direction and choreography is by Olivier Award-winner Matthew Bourne, set and costume design is by Tony Award winner Bob Crowley, co-choreography is by Olivier Award-winner Stephen Mear, and lighting design is by Olivier Award-winner Howard Harrison.
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Shubert Theatre, New York State
  225 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Shubert Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 225 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York, United States.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. It opened on October 21, 1913 with a series of Shakespearean plays, including Othello, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, staged by the Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company.
The theatre's most famous and longest tenant was A Chorus Line, with a run of 6137 performances lasting nearly fifteen years.
The top floor of the building houses the offices of the Shubert Organization. The theatre's auditorium and murals were restored in 1996. It has been designated a New York City landmark. Source
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Cort Theatre, New York State
  138 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Cort Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 138 West 48th Street in midtown-Manhattan. The Shuberts purchased the theatre in 1927.
Designed by Thomas W. Lamb, its facade was modeled after the Petit Trianon at Versailles, while architecture from the period of Louis XVI inspired the interior. The building was constructed by and named for former vaudevillean John Cort, general manager of the Northwestern Theatrical Association.
It opened on December 20, 1912 with Laurette Taylor starring in the play Peg o' My Heart, which ran for 603 performance, an auspicious start for the new venue. Numerous famous British actors have appeared at the Cort: Basil Rathbone played Dr. Nicholas Agi in The Swan in October 1923, and in April 1927 appeared as Vladimir Dubriski in Love is Like That. In October 1924 Henry Daniell appeared as Aubrey Tanqueray in The Second Mrs Tanqueray, was there again in August 1943 in Murder Without Crime, and in January 1946 appeared as Leontes in The Winter's Tale.
The theatre was used as a television studio housing The Merv Griffin Show from 1969-72. Source
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Ethel Barrymore Theatre, New York State
  243 West 47th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 243 West 47th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp and constructed by the Shuberts, it opened on December 20, 1928 with The Kingdom of God, a play selected by leading lady Ethel Barrymore. Over the next dozen years she returned to star in The Love Duel (1929), Scarlett Sister Mary (1930), The School for Scandal (1931), and An International Incident (1940).
It is the only surviving theatre of the many the Shuberts built for performers who were affiliated with them. It has been used continuously as a legitimate house, unlike many of the older theatres that have been used for a variety of purposes throughout the years. Source
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St. James Theatre, New York State
  246 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Grammy® Award-winning superstar Barry Manilow returns to the Broadway stage for the first time in more than two decades! Don't miss this unprecedented limited engagement as one of our most beloved entertainers performs songs from his massive catalog of hits in an intimate setting at the St. James Theatre on Broadway. From “Mandy” to "I Write the Songs" to "Copacabana (At The Copa)" and so many more, Manilow’s new Broadway show is destined to be as legendary as the man himself.
The St. James Theatre is located at 246 W. 44th St. Broadway, New York City, New York. It was built by Abraham L. Erlanger, theatrical producer and a founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, on the site of the original Sardi's restaurant. It opened in 1927 as The Erlanger. Upon Erlanger's death in 1930, control of the venue was taken over by the Astor family, who owned the land on which the theatre stood. The Astors renamed it the St. James Theatre.
The theatre was purchased by the Shuberts in the late 1930s. They were forced to sell it to the William L. McKnight in 1957 following the loss of an antitrust case. McKnight renovated the St. James and reopened it in 1958. In 1970, McKnight then transferred the theatre to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger, who had formed the Jujamcyn Amusement Corporation. Source
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Eugene O'Neill Theatre, New York State
  230 West 49th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
From Trey Parker and Matt Stone, four-time Emmy Award-winning creators of South Park comes this hilarious Broadway musical about a pair of mismatched Mormon boys sent on a mission to a place that's about as far from Salt Lake City as you can get.
The Book of Mormon is written in collaboration with Robert Lopez, the Tony Award-winning writer of Avenue Q, and co-directed by Mr. Parker and three-time Tony nominee Casey Nicholaw (Spamalot, The Drowsy Chaperone).
The Eugene O'Neill Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 230 West 49th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it was built for the Shuberts as part of a theatre-hotel complex named for 19th century tragedian Edwin Forrest. It opened on November 24, 1925 with the musical Mayflowers as its premiere production. It was renamed the Coronet in 1945 and rechristened the O'Neill in honor of the renowned American playwright in 1959 by then owner Lester Osterman. It later was purchased by playwright Neil Simon, who sold it to Jujamcyn Theatres in 1982.
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Studio 54, New York State
  254 West 54th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Now there are more chances to vote for who murdered Edwin Drood! The delightful and rollicking musical smash where the ending is entirely up to you—back on Broadway for the first time since winning the Tony® “Triple Crown” (Best Musical, Best Book, and Best Score)—has been extended through March 10, 2013.
Stephanie J. Block (Anything Goes), Will Chase (“Smash”), Tony Award® nominee Gregg Edelman (Wonderful Town), Tony winner Jim Norton (The Seafarer), and Tony winner Chita Rivera (Nine) star in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, the delightful musical smash from Tony-winning writer/composer Rupert Holmes (Curtains). Tony nominee Scott Ellis (She Loves Me) directs this show’s first-ever return to Broadway since winning the Tony “Triple Crown” (Best Musical, Best Book, and Best Score)!
Take a trip back in time to a Victorian music hall where a rowdy ensemble of actors mounts a staging of Charles Dickens’ unfinished novel. Everyone on stage is a suspect in the murder of young Edwin Drood, and it’s up to you to choose the killer! Is it John Jasper, Edwin’s protective but slightly maniacal uncle? Rosa Bud, his reluctant betrothed? The debauched Princess Puffer? Each performance ends differently, depending on what the audience decides!
Don’t miss this rollicking play-within-a-musical that The New York Times has called “ingenious.” Come help solve The Mystery of Edwin Drood!
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American Airlines Theatre, New York State
  227 West 42nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
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Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, New York State
  236 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 236 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-1918, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors like John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette and Estelle Winwood.
After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theater returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York City landmark in 1987. The 1,080-seat house was renamed for Gerald Schoenfeld, chairman of the Shubert Organization, in 2005. Source
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Laura Pels Theatre, New York State
  111 West 46th Street - New York, NY              
Lanford Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy Talley’s Folly returns in a joyful and moving new production starring Tony Award® nominee Danny Burstein (Golden Boy, Follies) and Emmy® and Golden Globe® nominee Sarah Paulson (“American Horror Story,” Roundabout’s Crimes of the Heart).
At the end of World War II, Matt Friedman, a Jewish immigrant who has spent his life keeping others at a distance, returns to the small town where he first met Sally Talley. Nothing like her conservative Protestant family and neighbors, Sally is a nurse with deep misgivings about the country’s future. After a lifetime of believing they’ll never truly belong in the world around them, Matt has worked up the courage to ask Sally for her hand, and convince her that they do belong—together.
Michael Wilson (The Best Man, Roundabout’s The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore) directs this funny and heart-warming play about finding love when you’ve nearly given up looking.
Performances begin on February 8, 2013 with an Opening Night of March 5, 2013 at the Laura Pels Theatre in the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre (111 West 46th Street). This is a limited engagement through April 28, 2013.
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Round House Theatre Silver Spring, Maryland
  8641 Colesville Road - Silver Spring, MD              
One of the largest and most acclaimed professional theatre companies in the metro Washington, DC area, Round House Theatre is led by Producing Artistic Director Blake Robison, who joined the company in June 2005. Based in Montgomery County, Maryland, Round House Theatre produces nearly 200 theatrical performances each season at its 400-seat Bethesda theatre and 150-seat black box theatre in Silver Spring. The company operates an education center in Silver Spring and annually reaches over 40,000 patrons there and across the region with strong educational programs.
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Barter Theatre
  127 West Main Street - Virginia, VA              
"Our passion can be felt in two unique venues of live performance. From Barter Theatre, able to accommodate 507 patrons, to the more intimate Barter Stage II with 167 seats around a thrust stage...where the action is up-close and personal. Set inside a historical building across the street from Barter Theatre, Barter Stage II is a great place to enjoy a Barter production. Also, located in the lobby at Barter Stage II is The Caf?. You can stop in for lunch or dinner any day, and enjoy delicious specialty sandwiches, desserts, coffees and more! The Player Company, the youth stage of the Barter, produces plays for teachers and students."
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Round House Theatre, Maryland
  4545 East-West Highway - Bethesda, MD              
One of the largest and most acclaimed professional theatre companies in the metro Washington, DC area, Round House Theatre is led by Producing Artistic Director Blake Robison, who joined the company in June 2005. Based in Montgomery County, Maryland, Round House Theatre produces nearly 200 theatrical performances each season at its 400-seat Bethesda theatre and 150-seat black box theatre in Silver Spring. The company operates an education center in Silver Spring and annually reaches over 40,000 patrons there and across the region with strong educational programs.