Midtown Theater

    Lyceum Theatre, 10036 Times Square

  149 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Lyceum Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 149 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
It has the distinction of being the oldest surviving Broadway venue (along with the New Amsterdam Theatre), the oldest continuously operating legitimate theatre in New York City, and the first Broadway theatre ever to be granted landmark status. It is one of the few theatres in New York to operate under its original name.
The theatre maintains most of its original Beaux-Arts design, including its elaborate marble staircases and undulating marquee. Although it has three levels, it is one of the smallest Broadway theatres in terms of capacity, seating only 950. An apartment located above the orchestra, originally used by Frohman, is now the headquarters of the Shubert Archives. Source
    Eugene O'Neill Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  230 West 49th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
From Trey Parker and Matt Stone, four-time Emmy Award-winning creators of South Park comes this hilarious Broadway musical about a pair of mismatched Mormon boys sent on a mission to a place that's about as far from Salt Lake City as you can get.
The Book of Mormon is written in collaboration with Robert Lopez, the Tony Award-winning writer of Avenue Q, and co-directed by Mr. Parker and three-time Tony nominee Casey Nicholaw (Spamalot, The Drowsy Chaperone).
The Eugene O'Neill Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 230 West 49th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it was built for the Shuberts as part of a theatre-hotel complex named for 19th century tragedian Edwin Forrest. It opened on November 24, 1925 with the musical Mayflowers as its premiere production. It was renamed the Coronet in 1945 and rechristened the O'Neill in honor of the renowned American playwright in 1959 by then owner Lester Osterman. It later was purchased by playwright Neil Simon, who sold it to Jujamcyn Theatres in 1982.
    Walter Kerr Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  218 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Heiress is the story of Catherine Sloper, the shy and sheltered daughter of a prominent New Yorker. Caught between the demands of an emotionally distant father and the attentions of a passionate young suitor, Catherine must navigate the terrain of love and regret, desire and duty, a chance for happiness and the burden of fortune…as only an heiress can.
The timeless New York story of society, status and the true cost of love. Jessica Chastain (Academy Award® nominee for The Help) makes her Broadway debut alongside David Strathairn (Academy Award® nominee for Good Night, and Good Luck), Dan Stevens (Matthew Crawley on Downton Abbey) and Judith Ivey (two-time Tony Award® winner), in the Tony Award®-winning play, The Heiress. Written by Ruth and Augustus Goetz and directed by Tony Award® nominated playwright and director Moisés Kaufman, this compelling drama will run for an 18-week limited engagement.
    American Airlines Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  227 West 42nd Street - New York, NY             
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A permanent home has long been a dream for the Roundabout Theatre Company. Since its establishment in 1965, Roundabout had moved from location to location, always searching for the next stop in what seemed to be a never-ending journey for permanency. From West 26th Street to West 23rd Street, from East 17th Street at Union Square then on to the Criterion Center, Roundabout seemed destined to live up to its name far too literally. All that changed in 1997, when The New 42nd Street Development project, backed by the City and State of New York, offered the historic Selwyn Theatre to Roundabout.
    Music Box Teatre, 10036 Times Square
  239 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Music Box Theater is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 239 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
The most aptly named theater on Broadway, the intimate Music Box was designed by architect C. Howard Crane and constructed by composer Irving Berlin and producer Sam H. Harris specifically to house Berlin's famed Music Box Revues. It opened in 1921 and hosted a new musical production every year until 1925, when it presented its first play, Cradle Snatchers, starring Humphrey Bogart. The following year, Chicago, the Maurine Dallas Watkins play that served as the basis for the hit musical, opened here. It housed a string of hits for the playwriting team of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, from their first collaboration Once in a Lifetime to their smash hit The Man Who Came to Dinner. Cole Porter and George and Ira Gershwin also presented shows here. Source
    Marquis Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  Broadway & 46th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Now playing: Evita.
Opened in 1986, the Marquis Theatre is one of the newest theatres to be built on Broadway. Located inside the Marriott Marquis Hotel, it was designed to provide maximum comfort for audiences and actors while conveying a feeling of intimacy. The venue features expansive backstage, high ceilings, state-of-the-art acoustics, wide aisles, comfortable seats, ample restrooms and parking.
Since its opening, the theatre has showcased a series of hit musicals including Me and My Girl, Gypsy, Man of La Mancha, The Goodbye Girl, Damn Yankees, Victor/Victoria, Peter Pan, Annie Get Your Gun and Thoroughly Modern Millie. Before or after seeing The Drowsy Chaperone, theatergoers can dine at one of the fine restaurants located throughout the hotel.
The Marquis has 1,611 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization's nine Broadway theatres.
    Cort Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  138 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Cort Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 138 West 48th Street in midtown-Manhattan. The Shuberts purchased the theatre in 1927.
Designed by Thomas W. Lamb, its facade was modeled after the Petit Trianon at Versailles, while architecture from the period of Louis XVI inspired the interior. The building was constructed by and named for former vaudevillean John Cort, general manager of the Northwestern Theatrical Association.
It opened on December 20, 1912 with Laurette Taylor starring in the play Peg o' My Heart, which ran for 603 performance, an auspicious start for the new venue. Numerous famous British actors have appeared at the Cort: Basil Rathbone played Dr. Nicholas Agi in The Swan in October 1923, and in April 1927 appeared as Vladimir Dubriski in Love is Like That. In October 1924 Henry Daniell appeared as Aubrey Tanqueray in The Second Mrs Tanqueray, was there again in August 1943 in Murder Without Crime, and in January 1946 appeared as Leontes in The Winter's Tale.
The theatre was used as a television studio housing The Merv Griffin Show from 1969-72. Source
    Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  Marvin Beck Theatre - 302 West 45th Street - New York, NY           
A legitimate Broadway theatre located at 302 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect G. Albert Lansburgh for vaudeville promoter Martin Beck, the theatre opened as the Martin Beck Theatre with a production of Madame Pompadour on November 11, 1924. It was the only theater in New York that was owned outright without a mortgage. It was designed to be the most opulent theater of its time, and has dressing rooms for 200 actors. The theatre has a seating capacity of 1,292 for plays and 1,282 for musicals.
This is one of five theatres owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. Source: en.wikipeddia.org
    Broadway Theatre, 10019 Murray Hill
  1681 Broadway - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Coming up: Rodgers And Hammerstein's Cinderella. Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is coming to Broadway for the first time ever! Four-time Tony Award nominee Douglas Carter Beane’s (Sister Act, Xanadu) delightfully romantic and hilarious take on the ultimate makeover story features all the classic elements you remember—the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more—plus some surprising new twists! Rediscover some of Rodgers + Hammerstein's most beloved songs, including “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It’s Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago" in this outrageously fun Broadway musical for dreamers of all ages. And not to worry... you'll be home well before the stroke of midnight!
The Broadway Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1681 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Eugene DeRosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day 1924 as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. It was re-named Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930 . (In 1937, known as Ciné Roma, it showed Italian films). The Shuberts bought it in 1939. It was renovated extensively in 1956 and 1986. The large stage (nearly sixty feet deep) and seating capacity (1761) have made it a popular theatre for musicals throughout the years.
    St. James Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  246 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Grammy® Award-winning superstar Barry Manilow returns to the Broadway stage for the first time in more than two decades! Don't miss this unprecedented limited engagement as one of our most beloved entertainers performs songs from his massive catalog of hits in an intimate setting at the St. James Theatre on Broadway. From “Mandy” to "I Write the Songs" to "Copacabana (At The Copa)" and so many more, Manilow’s new Broadway show is destined to be as legendary as the man himself.
The St. James Theatre is located at 246 W. 44th St. Broadway, New York City, New York. It was built by Abraham L. Erlanger, theatrical producer and a founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, on the site of the original Sardi's restaurant. It opened in 1927 as The Erlanger. Upon Erlanger's death in 1930, control of the venue was taken over by the Astor family, who owned the land on which the theatre stood. The Astors renamed it the St. James Theatre.
The theatre was purchased by the Shuberts in the late 1930s. They were forced to sell it to the William L. McKnight in 1957 following the loss of an antitrust case. McKnight renovated the St. James and reopened it in 1958. In 1970, McKnight then transferred the theatre to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger, who had formed the Jujamcyn Amusement Corporation. Source
    John Golden Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  252 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The John Golden Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 252 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed in a Moorish style along with the adjacent Royale Theatre by architect Herbert J. Krapp for Irwin Chanin, it opened as the Theater Masque on February 24, 1927 with the play Puppets of Passion. Seventy-six years later it would house another production known for its puppets, the award-winning Avenue Q.
In 1937, impresario John Golden acquired the theatre and renamed it for himself. It operated as a movie house in the 1940s and '50s before it was purchased by the Shuberts, who returned it to legitimate use.
With a seating capacity of only 800, it is one of the smallest houses on Broadway. Source
    Imperial Theatre, 10036 Times Square
  249 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Imperial Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 249 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. The theatre seats up to 1417 people.
The Shubert Organization's fiftieth venue in New York City, it was constructed to replace their outdated Lyric Theatre. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp specifically to accommodate musical theatre productions, it opened on December 25, 1923 with the Oscar Hammerstein II-Vincent Youmans production Mary Jane McKane. Since then, it has hosted numerous important musicals, including Annie Get Your Gun (1946), Fiddler on the Roof (1964), Dreamgirls (1981), The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1985), and Les Miserables (1990), which played at the theatre until 2003. Source
    Manhattan Center, 10001 Old Chelsea
  311 West 34th Street - The Hammerstein, The Grand - New York, NY           
Home to two of Manhattan’s most unique event spaces. The Hammerstein and The Grand offer an elegant setting for events of all kinds. With in-house recording studios, television studios and video post production facilities, the Manhattan Center has what it takes to make your next event a complete multimedia experience.
Located at 311 West 34th Street, the historic Manhattan Center building still stands over 100 years after it was first built as the Manhattan Opera House by Oscar Hammerstein I in 1906. Hammerstein built the opera house with the bold intention to take on the established Metropolitan Opera by featuring cheaper seats for the ordinary New Yorker. The Manhattan Opera house quickly became an alternative venue for many great operas and celebrated singers to make their debut.
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