Manhattan Theater

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Beacon Theatre, Upper West Side
  2124 Broadway - New York, NY              
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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, Lynyrd Skynyrd continues to make music and rock stages. Don't miss this legendary band at The Beacon Theatre on January 15!
The Beacon Theatre is the "older sister" to Radio City Music Hall. Both legendary venues were the "brainchild" of Samuel "Roxy" Rothafel, the great theatrical impresario and visionary of his time.
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Apollo Theater, Harlem+
  253 West 125th Street - Harlem - New York, NY              
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Yesterday…A place where thousands of young artists have stepped out into the spotlight and launched their careers. A place "where stars are born and legends are made." The legendary Apollo Theater is so much more than an historic landmark - it is a source of pride and a symbol of the brilliance of American artistic achievement. From 1934 when the Apollo first introduced its world-famous Amateur Night which launched the careers of legendary artists like Ella Fitzgerald, James Brown, Michael Jackson, D'Angelo and Lauryn Hill, the Apollo has maintained its position as the nation's most popular arena for emerging and established black and Latino performers.
3
Shubert Theatre, Midtown
  225 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Shubert Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 225 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York, United States.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. It opened on October 21, 1913 with a series of Shakespearean plays, including Othello, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, staged by the Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company.
The theatre's most famous and longest tenant was A Chorus Line, with a run of 6137 performances lasting nearly fifteen years.
The top floor of the building houses the offices of the Shubert Organization. The theatre's auditorium and murals were restored in 1996. It has been designated a New York City landmark. Source
4
Vivian Beaumont Theater, Upper West Side
  150 West 65th Street - (at Lincoln Center) - New York, NY              
The Vivian Beaumont Theater is a theater in New York City in the United States. It is located at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th Street, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It was designed by the renowned Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen. Although it was built for the presentation of plays such as those produced on Broadway, it differs from traditional Broadway theaters because of its amphitheater configuration and thrust stage. The building includes two auditoriums, the 1,080-seat Vivian Beaumont Theater and the 299-seat Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater (called The Forum until 1973). The Beaumont is considered a fairly large theater for dramatic plays and a medium-size theater for musicals. It is New York's only Broadway-class theater (eligible for Tony Awards) that is not located in the Theater District near Times Square. Source
5
Lyceum Theatre, Midtown
  149 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Lyceum Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 149 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
It has the distinction of being the oldest surviving Broadway venue (along with the New Amsterdam Theatre), the oldest continuously operating legitimate theatre in New York City, and the first Broadway theatre ever to be granted landmark status. It is one of the few theatres in New York to operate under its original name.
The theatre maintains most of its original Beaux-Arts design, including its elaborate marble staircases and undulating marquee. Although it has three levels, it is one of the smallest Broadway theatres in terms of capacity, seating only 950. An apartment located above the orchestra, originally used by Frohman, is now the headquarters of the Shubert Archives. Source
6
Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Midtown
  242 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. John Golden leased and renamed the theatre for himself from 1932 to 1937, when the Shubert Organization assumed ownership and leased the theater to CBS Radio until 1940, when it was restored to its original use and name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs. Source
7
Neil Simon Teatre, Midtown
  250 West 52nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Since 1927, this theatre was known as the Alvin. It was renamed in 1983 to honor America’s most prolific playwright, Neil Simon, following the successful engagement of Brighton Beach Memoirs, the first play of an autobiographical trilogy about his youth with his family. Fittingly, in 1985, the second play of Mr. Simon’s trilogy, Biloxi Blues played there successfully. In 1992, Mr. Simon returned again with his play, Jake’s Women.
Since 2000, the Neil Simon has been filled with music and dancing as the home to two of Broadway’s most popular productions, namely the acclaimed revival of The Music Man and, currently, the Tony Award®-winning Best Musical, Hairspray.
The Neil Simon Theatre has 1,445 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.
8
Manhattan Center, Midtown
  311 West 34th Street - The Hammerstein, The Grand - New York, NY              
Home to two of Manhattan’s most unique event spaces. The Hammerstein and The Grand offer an elegant setting for events of all kinds. With in-house recording studios, television studios and video post production facilities, the Manhattan Center has what it takes to make your next event a complete multimedia experience.
Located at 311 West 34th Street, the historic Manhattan Center building still stands over 100 years after it was first built as the Manhattan Opera House by Oscar Hammerstein I in 1906. Hammerstein built the opera house with the bold intention to take on the established Metropolitan Opera by featuring cheaper seats for the ordinary New Yorker. The Manhattan Opera house quickly became an alternative venue for many great operas and celebrated singers to make their debut.
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Vineyard Theatre, Greenwich Village+
  108 East 15th Street - New York, NY              
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NEW YORK PREMIERE: THE NORTH POOL By RAJIV JOSEPH and Directed by GIOVANNA SARDELLI. FEB 14 - MAR 24. In this riveting psychological thriller, a high school vice principal and a Middle Eastern-born transfer student engage in a politically and emotionally charged game of cat and mouse, with dangerous consequences. A powerful new play from Pulitzer Prize finalist Rajiv Joseph, author of Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, and recipient of The Vineyard’s Paula Vogel Playwriting Award.
Vineyard Theatreis a non-profit theatre company dedicated to new work, bold programming and the support of artists. One of America’s preeminent centers for the creation of new plays and musicals, Vineyard Theatre has consistently premiered provocative, groundbreaking works by both new and established writers.
10
Booth Theatre, Midtown
  222 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Booth Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York City.
The venue was the second New York City theatre to bear this name. The first was built by Booth himself in 1869 on the corner of 23rd Street and 6th Avenue.
The Booth Theatre appeared in the West Wing episode Posse Comitatus. It hosted a fictitous charity performance of War of the Roses which an equally fictitious President Bartlett attended while pondering the planned assassination of the Quamari Defence Minister. Source
11
Marquis Theatre, Midtown
  Broadway & 46th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Now playing: Evita.
Opened in 1986, the Marquis Theatre is one of the newest theatres to be built on Broadway. Located inside the Marriott Marquis Hotel, it was designed to provide maximum comfort for audiences and actors while conveying a feeling of intimacy. The venue features expansive backstage, high ceilings, state-of-the-art acoustics, wide aisles, comfortable seats, ample restrooms and parking.
Since its opening, the theatre has showcased a series of hit musicals including Me and My Girl, Gypsy, Man of La Mancha, The Goodbye Girl, Damn Yankees, Victor/Victoria, Peter Pan, Annie Get Your Gun and Thoroughly Modern Millie. Before or after seeing The Drowsy Chaperone, theatergoers can dine at one of the fine restaurants located throughout the hotel.
The Marquis has 1,611 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization's nine Broadway theatres.
12
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, Midtown
  236 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 236 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-1918, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors like John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette and Estelle Winwood.
After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theater returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York City landmark in 1987. The 1,080-seat house was renamed for Gerald Schoenfeld, chairman of the Shubert Organization, in 2005. Source