New York City Theater

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Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Manhattan

  242 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. John Golden leased and renamed the theatre for himself from 1932 to 1937, when the Shubert Organization assumed ownership and leased the theater to CBS Radio until 1940, when it was restored to its original use and name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs. Source
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Lyceum Theatre, Manhattan
  149 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Lyceum Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 149 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
It has the distinction of being the oldest surviving Broadway venue (along with the New Amsterdam Theatre), the oldest continuously operating legitimate theatre in New York City, and the first Broadway theatre ever to be granted landmark status. It is one of the few theatres in New York to operate under its original name.
The theatre maintains most of its original Beaux-Arts design, including its elaborate marble staircases and undulating marquee. Although it has three levels, it is one of the smallest Broadway theatres in terms of capacity, seating only 950. An apartment located above the orchestra, originally used by Frohman, is now the headquarters of the Shubert Archives. Source
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Belasco Theatre, Manhattan
  111 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Belasco Theatre is a legitmate Broadway theatre located at 111 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect George Keister for impresario David Belasco, the interior featured Tiffany lighting and ceiling panels, rich woodwork and expansive murals, and a ten-room duplex penthouse apartment that Belasco utilized as combination living quarters/office space.
Technically it was outfitted with the most advanced stagecraft tools available, including extensive lighting rigs, a hydraulics system, and vast wing and fly space.
It opened as the Stuyvesant Theatre on October 16, 1907 with the musical A Grand Army Man with Antoinette Perry. Three years later Belasco attached his own name to the venue. After his death in 1931, it was leased first by actress Katharine Cornell and then playwright Elmer Rice. The Shuberts bought it in 1949 and leased it to NBC for three years before returning it to legitimate use.
This theater is the subject of an urban legend that David Belasco's ghost haunts the theater every night. Some performers in the shows that played there have even claimed to have spotted him or other ghosts during performances. Source
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Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, Manhattan
  236 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 236 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-1918, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors like John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette and Estelle Winwood.
After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theater returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York City landmark in 1987. The 1,080-seat house was renamed for Gerald Schoenfeld, chairman of the Shubert Organization, in 2005. Source
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Gershwin Theatre, Manhattan
  222 West 51st Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The George Gershwin Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 51st Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed in an Art Nouveau style by set designer Ralph Alswang, it is situated on the lower levels of a towering office complex built on the side of the historical Capitol Theatre. It opened as the Uris Theatre on November 28, 1972 with the musical Via Galactica starring Raul Julia. It proved to be an inauspicious start for the venue, closing after only seven performances. From 1974-76 it served as a concert hall for limited engagements by a number of legendary pop music and jazz performers.
It was the first theatre constructed in New York City since 1928. With a seating capacity of 1933, it presently is the largest theatre on Broadway, with the exception of the New York State Theatre at Lincoln Center and New York City Center.
A Theatre Hall of Fame located in the lobby is a popular gathering place for audience members pre-show and during intermission. Source
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Longacre Theatre, Manhattan
  220 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Longacre Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 220 West 48th Street in midtown Manhattan.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named for Longacre Square, the original name for Times Square. The French neo-classical building was constructed by impresario Harry Frazee, better remembered as the owner of the Boston Red Sox who, needing money for his theatrical ventures, sold Babe Ruth's contract to the New York Yankees. A curse allegedly lingers on the theater as a result, and superstitious producers avoid it for fear they'll be backing a flop, as noted by William Golden in his seminal book The Season. Despite the rumor, a large number of performers who have appeared on stage here have taken home a Tony Award for their efforts.
The Longacre's first show was a production of the William Hurlbut-Frances Whitehouse comedy Are You a Crook?, which opened on May 1, 1913. With the exception of its use as a television studio in the mid-1940s to early 1950s, the theatre has operated as a legitimate Broadway venue. Source
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American Airlines Theatre, Manhattan
  227 West 42nd Street - New York, NY              
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A permanent home has long been a dream for the Roundabout Theatre Company. Since its establishment in 1965, Roundabout had moved from location to location, always searching for the next stop in what seemed to be a never-ending journey for permanency. From West 26th Street to West 23rd Street, from East 17th Street at Union Square then on to the Criterion Center, Roundabout seemed destined to live up to its name far too literally. All that changed in 1997, when The New 42nd Street Development project, backed by the City and State of New York, offered the historic Selwyn Theatre to Roundabout.
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Ethel Barrymore Theatre, Manhattan
  243 West 47th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 243 West 47th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp and constructed by the Shuberts, it opened on December 20, 1928 with The Kingdom of God, a play selected by leading lady Ethel Barrymore. Over the next dozen years she returned to star in The Love Duel (1929), Scarlett Sister Mary (1930), The School for Scandal (1931), and An International Incident (1940).
It is the only surviving theatre of the many the Shuberts built for performers who were affiliated with them. It has been used continuously as a legitimate house, unlike many of the older theatres that have been used for a variety of purposes throughout the years. Source
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Palace Theater, Manhattan
  Broadway and 47th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Palace Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1564 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architects Kirchoff & Rose, the theatre, built by California vaudeville entrepreneur and Broadway impresario Martin Beck, experienced a number of problems before it opened. E. F. Albee, one of the main executives for B. F. Keith and his powerful vaudeville circuit, demanded that Beck turn over three-quarters of the stock in the theatre in order to use acts from the Keith circuit. In addition, Oscar Hammerstein was the only person who could offer Keith acts in that section of Broadway, so Beck paid him off with $225,000. The theatre finally opened on March 24, 1913 with headliner Ed Wynn. To "play the Palace" meant that an entertainer had reached the pinnacle of his career, and it became a popular venue with performers like Sarah Bernhardt, Eddie Cantor, Bob Hope, Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker, George Jessel, and Jack Benny. Source
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Vineyard Theatre, Manhattan
  108 East 15th Street - New York, NY              
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NEW YORK PREMIERE: THE NORTH POOL By RAJIV JOSEPH and Directed by GIOVANNA SARDELLI. FEB 14 - MAR 24. In this riveting psychological thriller, a high school vice principal and a Middle Eastern-born transfer student engage in a politically and emotionally charged game of cat and mouse, with dangerous consequences. A powerful new play from Pulitzer Prize finalist Rajiv Joseph, author of Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, and recipient of The Vineyard’s Paula Vogel Playwriting Award.
Vineyard Theatreis a non-profit theatre company dedicated to new work, bold programming and the support of artists. One of America’s preeminent centers for the creation of new plays and musicals, Vineyard Theatre has consistently premiered provocative, groundbreaking works by both new and established writers.
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Brooklyn Academy of Music
  30 Lafayette Avenue - Brooklyn, NY              
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2013 Winter/Spring Season. Based on The Suit by Can Themba, Mothobi Mutloatse, and Barney Simon Direction, adaptation, and music by Peter Brook, Marie-Hélène Estienne, and Franck Krawczyk The renowned Peter Brook—whose 1987 production of The Mahabharata inaugurated the BAM Majestic Theater (now the BAM Harvey Theater)—returns with a music-filled adaptation of South African writer Can Themba’s piercing tale of simmering resentment and tragedy, The Suit. A wife caught in the act, her lover fleeing the scene, a suit left behind. It’s the perfect recipe for a husband’s punishing, humiliating decree: go on with business as usual, he says to his spouse, but take your lover’s suit everywhere you go as a ghostly reminder of your betrayal. Using an innovative staging that integrates live musicians directly into the action, Brook makes Themba’s volatile work sing. A hummed “Strange Fruit,” African melodies, and Schubert lieder thicken the tense, poisoned air of this apartheid-era summer in which a shared wound was not allowed to heal.
Dating from its first performance in 1861, BAM has grown into a thriving urban arts center that brings international performing arts and film to Brooklyn. The first BAM facility at 176-194 Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights was originally conceived by the Philharmonic Society of Brooklyn as a home for its concerts. It housed a large theater seating 2,200, a smaller concert hall, dressing and chorus rooms, and a vast "baronial" kitchen. BAM presented both amateur and professional music and theater productions. Performers included Ellen Terry, Edwin Booth, Tomas Salvini, and Fritz Kreisler.
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Imperial Theatre, Manhattan
  249 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Imperial Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 249 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. The theatre seats up to 1417 people.
The Shubert Organization's fiftieth venue in New York City, it was constructed to replace their outdated Lyric Theatre. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp specifically to accommodate musical theatre productions, it opened on December 25, 1923 with the Oscar Hammerstein II-Vincent Youmans production Mary Jane McKane. Since then, it has hosted numerous important musicals, including Annie Get Your Gun (1946), Fiddler on the Roof (1964), Dreamgirls (1981), The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1985), and Les Miserables (1990), which played at the theatre until 2003. Source
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St.George Theatre
  35 Hyatt Street (2 blocks from the ferry) - Staten Island, NY              
The magnificent St. George Theatre shines once again and serves Staten Island and all of New York. By polishing this treasured jewel, the integrity of its' unique structure will be maintained and a major boost will be given to the revitalization efforts of this North Shore community. It serves as a cultural arts center for a myriad of activities including outreach educational programs, architectural tours, television and film shoots, concerts, comedy, Broadway touring companies, children's shows and many local community events and performances.