New York State Theater

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New Amsterdam Theatre, New York City
  Broadway & 42nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Based on P.I. Travers cherished stories and the classic 1964 Walt Disney film, Mary Poppins features the Sherman brothers original Academy Award-winning songs. The show has been created, in collaboration with Cameron Mackintosh, by Academy Award-winning screenwriter Julian Fellowes, who has written the book, and the Olivier Award-winning team of George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, who have composed new songs and additional music and lyrics.
Olivier Award-winning director Richard Lyre leads a dream team of vision and stagecraft bringing to life the story of the Banks family and their magical nanny. Co-direction and choreography is by Olivier Award-winner Matthew Bourne, set and costume design is by Tony Award winner Bob Crowley, co-choreography is by Olivier Award-winner Stephen Mear, and lighting design is by Olivier Award-winner Howard Harrison.
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Apollo Theater, New York City
  253 West 125th Street - Harlem - New York, NY              
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Yesterday…A place where thousands of young artists have stepped out into the spotlight and launched their careers. A place "where stars are born and legends are made." The legendary Apollo Theater is so much more than an historic landmark - it is a source of pride and a symbol of the brilliance of American artistic achievement. From 1934 when the Apollo first introduced its world-famous Amateur Night which launched the careers of legendary artists like Ella Fitzgerald, James Brown, Michael Jackson, D'Angelo and Lauryn Hill, the Apollo has maintained its position as the nation's most popular arena for emerging and established black and Latino performers.
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Shubert Theatre, New York City
  225 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Shubert Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 225 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York, United States.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. It opened on October 21, 1913 with a series of Shakespearean plays, including Othello, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, staged by the Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company.
The theatre's most famous and longest tenant was A Chorus Line, with a run of 6137 performances lasting nearly fifteen years.
The top floor of the building houses the offices of the Shubert Organization. The theatre's auditorium and murals were restored in 1996. It has been designated a New York City landmark. Source
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Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York City
  30 Lafayette Avenue - Brooklyn, NY              
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2013 Winter/Spring Season. Based on The Suit by Can Themba, Mothobi Mutloatse, and Barney Simon Direction, adaptation, and music by Peter Brook, Marie-Hélène Estienne, and Franck Krawczyk The renowned Peter Brook—whose 1987 production of The Mahabharata inaugurated the BAM Majestic Theater (now the BAM Harvey Theater)—returns with a music-filled adaptation of South African writer Can Themba’s piercing tale of simmering resentment and tragedy, The Suit. A wife caught in the act, her lover fleeing the scene, a suit left behind. It’s the perfect recipe for a husband’s punishing, humiliating decree: go on with business as usual, he says to his spouse, but take your lover’s suit everywhere you go as a ghostly reminder of your betrayal. Using an innovative staging that integrates live musicians directly into the action, Brook makes Themba’s volatile work sing. A hummed “Strange Fruit,” African melodies, and Schubert lieder thicken the tense, poisoned air of this apartheid-era summer in which a shared wound was not allowed to heal.
Dating from its first performance in 1861, BAM has grown into a thriving urban arts center that brings international performing arts and film to Brooklyn. The first BAM facility at 176-194 Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights was originally conceived by the Philharmonic Society of Brooklyn as a home for its concerts. It housed a large theater seating 2,200, a smaller concert hall, dressing and chorus rooms, and a vast "baronial" kitchen. BAM presented both amateur and professional music and theater productions. Performers included Ellen Terry, Edwin Booth, Tomas Salvini, and Fritz Kreisler.
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Longacre Theatre, New York City
  220 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Longacre Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 220 West 48th Street in midtown Manhattan.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named for Longacre Square, the original name for Times Square. The French neo-classical building was constructed by impresario Harry Frazee, better remembered as the owner of the Boston Red Sox who, needing money for his theatrical ventures, sold Babe Ruth's contract to the New York Yankees. A curse allegedly lingers on the theater as a result, and superstitious producers avoid it for fear they'll be backing a flop, as noted by William Golden in his seminal book The Season. Despite the rumor, a large number of performers who have appeared on stage here have taken home a Tony Award for their efforts.
The Longacre's first show was a production of the William Hurlbut-Frances Whitehouse comedy Are You a Crook?, which opened on May 1, 1913. With the exception of its use as a television studio in the mid-1940s to early 1950s, the theatre has operated as a legitimate Broadway venue. Source
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Majestic Theatre, New York City
  247 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Playing in January 2013: The Phantom Of The Opera. Winner of 7 1988 Tony Awards including Best Musical, The Phantom of the Opera is based on the novel by Gaston Leroux. It tells the story of the hideously deformed Phantom who lurks beneath the stage of the Paris Opera, exercising a reign of terror over its occupants. The phantom falls in love with the young Soprano devoting himself to creating a new star for the Opera by nurturing her extraordinary talents and employing all the skills at his disposal.
The Majestic Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 245 West 44th Street in midtown Manhattan.
An earlier theatre with the same name had been located at 5 Columbus Circle, the present site of the Time-Warner building. Designed in 1903 by John Duncan, the architect of Grant's Tomb, the theatre hosted original musicals, including The Wizard of Oz and Babes in Toyland, and briefly served as a studio for NBC. It was renamed the Park Theatre in 1911 and demolished in 1954. Source
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Broadhurst Theatre, New York City
  235 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Broadhurst Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 235 West 44th Street in midtown Manhattan.
It was designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, one of the major theatre designers of the early 1900s. Built back-to-back with the Plymouth, it was meant to resemble the style of the neighboring Henry B. Herts-designed Shubert and Booth theaters, using less expensive brick and terra cotta materials on the facades. Like all of Krapp's work during this period, it features minimal ornamentation, a single balcony, wide space, and excellent sightlines. Unlike the Majestic Theatre, which has housed The Phantom of the Opera (musical) since 1988, the Broadhurst does not run parallel to the street, but rather the stage is perpendicular. Source
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American Airlines Theatre, New York City
  227 West 42nd Street - New York, NY              
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A permanent home has long been a dream for the Roundabout Theatre Company. Since its establishment in 1965, Roundabout had moved from location to location, always searching for the next stop in what seemed to be a never-ending journey for permanency. From West 26th Street to West 23rd Street, from East 17th Street at Union Square then on to the Criterion Center, Roundabout seemed destined to live up to its name far too literally. All that changed in 1997, when The New 42nd Street Development project, backed by the City and State of New York, offered the historic Selwyn Theatre to Roundabout.
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Richard Rodgers Theatre, New York City
  226 West 46th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
On Broadway through March 30th only. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.
Opened in 1924 and originally called the 46th Street Theatre, it was renamed in 1990 to honor the legendary composer Richard Rodgers, whose shows defined Broadway for over three decades. This theatres has been a house of hits hosting a long line of famed musicals including Anything Goes, Guys and Dolls, Damn Yankees, How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas; Nine, Chicago, and Movin' Out.
The theatre was refurbished in 2006 and houses The Richard Rodgers Gallery featuring historic memorabilia from its namesake's storied career.
The Richard Rodgers has 1,319 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization's nine Broadway theatres.
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Eugene O'Neill Theatre, New York City
  230 West 49th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
From Trey Parker and Matt Stone, four-time Emmy Award-winning creators of South Park comes this hilarious Broadway musical about a pair of mismatched Mormon boys sent on a mission to a place that's about as far from Salt Lake City as you can get.
The Book of Mormon is written in collaboration with Robert Lopez, the Tony Award-winning writer of Avenue Q, and co-directed by Mr. Parker and three-time Tony nominee Casey Nicholaw (Spamalot, The Drowsy Chaperone).
The Eugene O'Neill Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 230 West 49th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it was built for the Shuberts as part of a theatre-hotel complex named for 19th century tragedian Edwin Forrest. It opened on November 24, 1925 with the musical Mayflowers as its premiere production. It was renamed the Coronet in 1945 and rechristened the O'Neill in honor of the renowned American playwright in 1959 by then owner Lester Osterman. It later was purchased by playwright Neil Simon, who sold it to Jujamcyn Theatres in 1982.
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Neil Simon Teatre, New York City
  250 West 52nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Since 1927, this theatre was known as the Alvin. It was renamed in 1983 to honor America’s most prolific playwright, Neil Simon, following the successful engagement of Brighton Beach Memoirs, the first play of an autobiographical trilogy about his youth with his family. Fittingly, in 1985, the second play of Mr. Simon’s trilogy, Biloxi Blues played there successfully. In 1992, Mr. Simon returned again with his play, Jake’s Women.
Since 2000, the Neil Simon has been filled with music and dancing as the home to two of Broadway’s most popular productions, namely the acclaimed revival of The Music Man and, currently, the Tony Award®-winning Best Musical, Hairspray.
The Neil Simon Theatre has 1,445 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.
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Vineyard Theatre, New York City
  108 East 15th Street - New York, NY              
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NEW YORK PREMIERE: THE NORTH POOL By RAJIV JOSEPH and Directed by GIOVANNA SARDELLI. FEB 14 - MAR 24. In this riveting psychological thriller, a high school vice principal and a Middle Eastern-born transfer student engage in a politically and emotionally charged game of cat and mouse, with dangerous consequences. A powerful new play from Pulitzer Prize finalist Rajiv Joseph, author of Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, and recipient of The Vineyard’s Paula Vogel Playwriting Award.
Vineyard Theatreis a non-profit theatre company dedicated to new work, bold programming and the support of artists. One of America’s preeminent centers for the creation of new plays and musicals, Vineyard Theatre has consistently premiered provocative, groundbreaking works by both new and established writers.
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Manhattan Center, New York City
  311 West 34th Street - The Hammerstein, The Grand - New York, NY              
Home to two of Manhattan’s most unique event spaces. The Hammerstein and The Grand offer an elegant setting for events of all kinds. With in-house recording studios, television studios and video post production facilities, the Manhattan Center has what it takes to make your next event a complete multimedia experience.
Located at 311 West 34th Street, the historic Manhattan Center building still stands over 100 years after it was first built as the Manhattan Opera House by Oscar Hammerstein I in 1906. Hammerstein built the opera house with the bold intention to take on the established Metropolitan Opera by featuring cheaper seats for the ordinary New Yorker. The Manhattan Opera house quickly became an alternative venue for many great operas and celebrated singers to make their debut.
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Al Hirschfeld Theatre, New York City
  Marvin Beck Theatre - 302 West 45th Street - New York, NY              
A legitimate Broadway theatre located at 302 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect G. Albert Lansburgh for vaudeville promoter Martin Beck, the theatre opened as the Martin Beck Theatre with a production of Madame Pompadour on November 11, 1924. It was the only theater in New York that was owned outright without a mortgage. It was designed to be the most opulent theater of its time, and has dressing rooms for 200 actors. The theatre has a seating capacity of 1,292 for plays and 1,282 for musicals.
This is one of five theatres owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. Source: en.wikipeddia.org
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St.George Theatre, New York City
  35 Hyatt Street (2 blocks from the ferry) - Staten Island, NY              
The magnificent St. George Theatre shines once again and serves Staten Island and all of New York. By polishing this treasured jewel, the integrity of its' unique structure will be maintained and a major boost will be given to the revitalization efforts of this North Shore community. It serves as a cultural arts center for a myriad of activities including outreach educational programs, architectural tours, television and film shoots, concerts, comedy, Broadway touring companies, children's shows and many local community events and performances.
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Minskoff Theatre, New York City
  200 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Disney presents a musical that brings The Lion King's wildly popular story, the Oscar winning Elton John / Tim Rice songs, and an entire African landscape to the stage of the specially adapted Minskoff Theater. Directed and designed by Tony Award winner Julie Taymor, THE LION KING fills the theatre with sights and sounds of one of Broadways most imaginative new talents - all to bring new life to Disneys crowd pleasing story of a young princes adventure-filled journey to adulthood - and the throne.
Giraffes strut, birds swoop, gazelles leap! The entire savanna comes to life and, as the music soars, Pride Rock slowly rises out of the stage. This is The Lion King. The winner of six 1998 Tony Awards, including Best New Musical, it is the story of a young lion cub named Simba who struggles to accept the responsibilities of adulthood and his destined role as king. To bring the classic 1994 film to life, Disney turned to the story's roots, its rich mythology, powerful human drama and primal African rhythms to create a fantastic new musical unlike anything Broadway has ever seen.
The modern theatre, with a very large seating capacity of 1,621 seats, was designed by the architectural firm of Kahn and Jacobs and offers a spectacular view of the Great White Way from the glass front of the building on all levels of the theatre.
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Center for Performing Arts, Dutchess County
  661 Route 308 - Rhinebeck, NY              
The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck (known familiarly as The CENTER, and legally as Rhinebeck Performing Arts, Inc. or RPA) is a non-profit arts organization which offers performances and classes throughout the year. Performing and teaching artists are of local, national and international talent.
The Center serves as a regular performance venue for local theater companies including CENTERstage Productions (Death of a Salesman, Cabaret, My Fair Lady) the Gilbert & Sullivan Musical Theater Company (The Mikado, A Little Night Music, The Pirates of Penzance), Kids on Stage (Cinderella, The Emperor's New Clothes), Rhinebeck Theater Society (HONK!, The Complete Works of Shakespeare, Abridged, Oliver!), and Up In One Productions (Chicago, Fiddler on the Roof, The Wizard of Oz). The CENTER also hosts appearances by artists such as Jeff Boyer, Brian Bradley, Elaine Colandrea, Alpin Hong, Kitty Jones, Jeff McBride, The Puppet People, Solas an Lae, Tanglewood Marionettes, Pitchfork Militia, Barbara Rankin, and David Temple, to name a few.
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Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Ar, Dutchess County
   - Annandale-on-Hudson, NY              
The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College offers an architecturally bold and dynamic environment for innovative artistic presentation in the Hudson Valley. Designed by Frank Gehry, the Fisher Center provides audiences with a world-class complex that inspires risk-taking performances and provocative programs in orchestral, chamber, and jazz music and theater, dance, and opera by American and international artists. The Center is also home to Bard College's Theater Program and Dance Program.