New York State Newspapers

    Bronx News, New York City
  135 Dreiser Loop - Bronx, NY           
Every day thousands of readers click on Bronx News for breaking news, politics, crime, sports (including the NY Yankees), real estate and the issues affecting your neighborhood.
    Irish Echo, New York City
  309 5th Avenue - New York, NY            
The largest circulation Irish American weekly newspaper, with a 50-state subscription base. Founded in 1928, the national tabloid is on newsstands in major American cities every Wednesday.
    Queens Tribune, New York City
  174-15 Horace Harding Expwy - New York, NY            
The Queens Tribune is a free weekly newspaper founded as the monthly Flushing Tribune in February 1970 by Gary Ackerman. It is based in Fresh Meadows. The Tribune is a member of the New York Press Association.
Every month, the newspaper issues a special edition that focuses on a given topic. Recurring examples include the Best of Queens, Arts & Culture, Blue Book, Gay Pride, and Community Characters editions. Source
    Amsterdam News, New York City
  2340 Frederick Douglass Blvd - New York, NY            
A $10 Investment 95 years ago turned the Amsterdam News into one of New York's largest and most influential Black-owned and operated business institutions.
On December 4, 1909, the late James H. Anderson put out the first issue of the Amsterdam News. He had $10 in his pocket, six sheets of paper, a lead pencil and a dressmaker's table.
The newspaper was one of only 50 Black papers in the United States at that time, and it was sold for 2 cents a copy from Anderson's home at 132 W. 65th St., in the San Juan Hill section of Manhattan. With the spread of Blacks to Harlem and the growing success of the paper, Anderson moved the Amsterdam News uptown to 17 W. 135th St. in 1910. In 1916, it moved to 2293 Seventh Ave., and in 1938, it moved again, to 2271 Seventh Ave. In the early 1940s, the paper relocated to its present address at 2340 Eighth Ave.
    Haitian Times, New York City
   - Brooklyn, NY            
The Haitian Times is a weekly newspaper for Haitians living in the wider area of New York City, New York, United States. The newspaper is printed in English, as opposed to French or Haitian Creole, and is based in Brooklyn. According to the website of the newspaper, the total weekly circulation is 30,000, Brooklyn circulation is 18,000, Queens, New York City circulation is 6,000, Long Island circulation is 4,000, New Jersey circulation is 1,000, and circulation beoynd greater metropolitan New York City is 1,000. Source
    Staten Island Advance, New York City
  950 Fingerboard Road - New York, NY           
The Staten Island Advance is a daily newspaper published in the borough of Staten Island in New York City. It is the only daily newspaper published in the borough and the largest by circulation, covering news of local and community interest in the borough, including borough politics.
The Advance was created in 1886 by printer John J. Crawford and businessman James C. Kennedy as the Richmond County Advance. The name was changed to the Daily Advance before the current name. When the Advance began there were nine competing daily newspapers in Staten Island. The circulation of the Advance surpassed its early competitors, and the circulation grew from 4,500 in 1910, to over 80,000 by the mid 1990s. Source
    New Voice of New York, New York City
   - New York, NY           
    New York Observer, The, New York City
  915 Broadway, 9th Floor - New York, NY            
The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987, by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. The Observer focuses on the city's culture, real estate, the media, politics and the entertainment and publishing industries.
The New York Observer asserts to advertisers that it delivers Manhattan’s most affluent, educated and influential consumers, with the average net worth of its readership exceeding $1.7 million and 96% of readers being college graduates. It has a paid circulation of 51,000. The Observer operates several blogs: The Politicker, the Daily Transom, the Media Mob, and the Real Estate. Source
    Village Voice, The, New York City
  36 Cooper Square - New York, NY            
The Village Voice is a free weekly newspaper in New York City, United States featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. It is also distributed throughout the United States on a pay basis. Source: en.wikipedia.org
    Billboard, New York City
  BPI Communications - 1515 Broadway - New York, NY           
    Irish Voice, New York City
  432 Park Avenue South - New York, NY           
Irish news is the meat and potatoes of IrishCentral.com. News from Ireland and from all the homes of the global Irish in the United States and around the Irish world.
    New York Post, New York City
  210 South Street - New York, NY            
The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and generally acknowledged as the oldest to have been published continually as a daily, although -- like most other papers -- its publication has been interrupted by labor actions.[2] Since 1993, it has been owned by media mogul Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, which had owned it previously from 1976 to 1988. It is the 6th-largest newspaper in the U.S. by circulation.[3] Its editorial offices are located at 1211 Avenue of the Americas, in New York City, New York. Source
    India Abroad, New York City
  43 West 24th Street - New York, NY           
ia Abroad is a weekly newspaper published from New York City, which focuses on Indian news meant for an Indian American, Indian diaspora and expatriate audience. The publication is known for its annual award ceremony for the "India Abroad Person of the Year."
India Abroad was founded by Indian American publisher Gopal Raju in 1970. [1] India Abroad calls itself "the oldest Indian newspaper published in North America." Under Raju's guidance, India Abroad quickly gained a reputation as one of the most credible, well researched voices for the Indian American community. The Economist, a British weekly international affairs magazine, once referred to India Abroad as a daily publication of “unusually high quality”. Source
    New York Law Journal, New York City
  111 8th Avenue - New York, NY           
It's not easy for busy attorneys to keep up with all the new developments and trends in New York's fast-paced legal scene. That's why, every day, thousands of New York lawyers take time from their hectic schedules to read the New York Law Journal.
In just a few minutes each business day, readers get not only the latest news -- they find court information, decisional law, and advance word on new statutes and regulations, coupled with the useful and practical analysis, scholarly insight, and professional perspective they need to make sense of it all. Our reporters know all the right sources to get the behind-the-scenes news -- on firms, on judicial appointments, on upcoming professional requirements -- that you need. You'll get the inside story on what prosecutors, judges, legislators and law firms are up to -- and how it's likely to affect your practice.
    The Onion, New York City
  536 Broadway - New York, NY              
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The Onion is an American "fake news" organization. It features satirical articles reporting on international, national, and local news as well as an entertainment newspaper and website known as The A.V. Club. It claims a national print circulation of 690,000 and says 61 percent of its web site readers are between 18 and 44 years old.
The Onion's articles comment on current events, both real and imagined. It parodies traditional newspaper features, such as editorials, man-on-the-street interviews, and stock quotes, as well as traditional newspaper layout and AP-style editorial voice. Much of its humor depends on presenting everyday events as newsworthy items, and by playing on commonly used phrases, as in the headline "Drugs Win Drug War."
A second part of the newspaper is a non-satirical entertainment section called The A.V. Club that features interviews and reviews of various newly-released media, and other weekly features. The print edition also contains restaurant reviews and previews of upcoming live entertainment specific to cities where a print edition is published. The online incarnation of The A.V. Club has its own domain, includes its own regular features (including the syndicated weekly sex advice column Savage Love), A.V. Club blogs and reader forums, and presents itself as a separate entity from The Onion itself. Source
    New York Times, The, New York City
  229 West 43rd Street - New York, NY              
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The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded in 1851 and published in New York City. The largest metropolitan newspaper in the United States, "The Gray Lady"—named for its staid appearance and style—is regarded as a national newspaper of record.
The Times is owned by The New York Times Company, which publishes 18 other newspapers, including the International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe. The company's chairman is Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., whose family has controlled the paper since 1896.
The New York Times motto, as printed in the upper left-hand corner of the front page, is "All the News That's Fit to Print." It is organized into sections: News, Opinions, Business, Arts, Science, Sports, Style and Features. The Times stayed with the eight-column format for several years after most papers switched to six columns, and it was one of the last newspapers to adopt color photography. The Times has won the most Pulitzer Prizes (98) of any paper. Its website is one of the most popular, receiving over 14 million unique visitors in August 2008. Source