New York City Theater

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Al Hirschfeld Theatre, Manhattan

  Marvin Beck Theatre - 302 West 45th Street - New York, NY              
A legitimate Broadway theatre located at 302 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect G. Albert Lansburgh for vaudeville promoter Martin Beck, the theatre opened as the Martin Beck Theatre with a production of Madame Pompadour on November 11, 1924. It was the only theater in New York that was owned outright without a mortgage. It was designed to be the most opulent theater of its time, and has dressing rooms for 200 actors. The theatre has a seating capacity of 1,292 for plays and 1,282 for musicals.
This is one of five theatres owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. Source: en.wikipeddia.org
2
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, Manhattan
  236 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 236 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-1918, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors like John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette and Estelle Winwood.
After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theater returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York City landmark in 1987. The 1,080-seat house was renamed for Gerald Schoenfeld, chairman of the Shubert Organization, in 2005. Source
3
Apollo Theater, Manhattan
  253 West 125th Street - Harlem - New York, NY              
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Yesterday…A place where thousands of young artists have stepped out into the spotlight and launched their careers. A place "where stars are born and legends are made." The legendary Apollo Theater is so much more than an historic landmark - it is a source of pride and a symbol of the brilliance of American artistic achievement. From 1934 when the Apollo first introduced its world-famous Amateur Night which launched the careers of legendary artists like Ella Fitzgerald, James Brown, Michael Jackson, D'Angelo and Lauryn Hill, the Apollo has maintained its position as the nation's most popular arena for emerging and established black and Latino performers.
4
Belasco Theatre, Manhattan
  111 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Belasco Theatre is a legitmate Broadway theatre located at 111 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect George Keister for impresario David Belasco, the interior featured Tiffany lighting and ceiling panels, rich woodwork and expansive murals, and a ten-room duplex penthouse apartment that Belasco utilized as combination living quarters/office space.
Technically it was outfitted with the most advanced stagecraft tools available, including extensive lighting rigs, a hydraulics system, and vast wing and fly space.
It opened as the Stuyvesant Theatre on October 16, 1907 with the musical A Grand Army Man with Antoinette Perry. Three years later Belasco attached his own name to the venue. After his death in 1931, it was leased first by actress Katharine Cornell and then playwright Elmer Rice. The Shuberts bought it in 1949 and leased it to NBC for three years before returning it to legitimate use.
This theater is the subject of an urban legend that David Belasco's ghost haunts the theater every night. Some performers in the shows that played there have even claimed to have spotted him or other ghosts during performances. Source
5
St.George Theatre
  35 Hyatt Street (2 blocks from the ferry) - Staten Island, NY              
The magnificent St. George Theatre shines once again and serves Staten Island and all of New York. By polishing this treasured jewel, the integrity of its' unique structure will be maintained and a major boost will be given to the revitalization efforts of this North Shore community. It serves as a cultural arts center for a myriad of activities including outreach educational programs, architectural tours, television and film shoots, concerts, comedy, Broadway touring companies, children's shows and many local community events and performances.
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Shubert Theatre, Manhattan
  225 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Shubert Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 225 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York, United States.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. It opened on October 21, 1913 with a series of Shakespearean plays, including Othello, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, staged by the Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company.
The theatre's most famous and longest tenant was A Chorus Line, with a run of 6137 performances lasting nearly fifteen years.
The top floor of the building houses the offices of the Shubert Organization. The theatre's auditorium and murals were restored in 1996. It has been designated a New York City landmark. Source
7
Laura Pels Theatre, Manhattan
  111 West 46th Street - New York, NY              
Lanford Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy Talley’s Folly returns in a joyful and moving new production starring Tony Award® nominee Danny Burstein (Golden Boy, Follies) and Emmy® and Golden Globe® nominee Sarah Paulson (“American Horror Story,” Roundabout’s Crimes of the Heart).
At the end of World War II, Matt Friedman, a Jewish immigrant who has spent his life keeping others at a distance, returns to the small town where he first met Sally Talley. Nothing like her conservative Protestant family and neighbors, Sally is a nurse with deep misgivings about the country’s future. After a lifetime of believing they’ll never truly belong in the world around them, Matt has worked up the courage to ask Sally for her hand, and convince her that they do belong—together.
Michael Wilson (The Best Man, Roundabout’s The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore) directs this funny and heart-warming play about finding love when you’ve nearly given up looking.
Performances begin on February 8, 2013 with an Opening Night of March 5, 2013 at the Laura Pels Theatre in the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre (111 West 46th Street). This is a limited engagement through April 28, 2013.
8
Neil Simon Teatre, Manhattan
  250 West 52nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Since 1927, this theatre was known as the Alvin. It was renamed in 1983 to honor America’s most prolific playwright, Neil Simon, following the successful engagement of Brighton Beach Memoirs, the first play of an autobiographical trilogy about his youth with his family. Fittingly, in 1985, the second play of Mr. Simon’s trilogy, Biloxi Blues played there successfully. In 1992, Mr. Simon returned again with his play, Jake’s Women.
Since 2000, the Neil Simon has been filled with music and dancing as the home to two of Broadway’s most popular productions, namely the acclaimed revival of The Music Man and, currently, the Tony Award®-winning Best Musical, Hairspray.
The Neil Simon Theatre has 1,445 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.
9
Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Manhattan
  242 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. John Golden leased and renamed the theatre for himself from 1932 to 1937, when the Shubert Organization assumed ownership and leased the theater to CBS Radio until 1940, when it was restored to its original use and name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs. Source
10
Vineyard Theatre, Manhattan
  108 East 15th Street - New York, NY              
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NEW YORK PREMIERE: THE NORTH POOL By RAJIV JOSEPH and Directed by GIOVANNA SARDELLI. FEB 14 - MAR 24. In this riveting psychological thriller, a high school vice principal and a Middle Eastern-born transfer student engage in a politically and emotionally charged game of cat and mouse, with dangerous consequences. A powerful new play from Pulitzer Prize finalist Rajiv Joseph, author of Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, and recipient of The Vineyard’s Paula Vogel Playwriting Award.
Vineyard Theatreis a non-profit theatre company dedicated to new work, bold programming and the support of artists. One of America’s preeminent centers for the creation of new plays and musicals, Vineyard Theatre has consistently premiered provocative, groundbreaking works by both new and established writers.
11
Walter Kerr Theatre, Manhattan
  218 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Heiress is the story of Catherine Sloper, the shy and sheltered daughter of a prominent New Yorker. Caught between the demands of an emotionally distant father and the attentions of a passionate young suitor, Catherine must navigate the terrain of love and regret, desire and duty, a chance for happiness and the burden of fortune…as only an heiress can.
The timeless New York story of society, status and the true cost of love. Jessica Chastain (Academy Award® nominee for The Help) makes her Broadway debut alongside David Strathairn (Academy Award® nominee for Good Night, and Good Luck), Dan Stevens (Matthew Crawley on Downton Abbey) and Judith Ivey (two-time Tony Award® winner), in the Tony Award®-winning play, The Heiress. Written by Ruth and Augustus Goetz and directed by Tony Award® nominated playwright and director Moisés Kaufman, this compelling drama will run for an 18-week limited engagement.
12
Winter Garden Theatre, Manhattan
  1634 Broadway at 50th Street - Theater District - New York, NY              
Playwing this winter 2013: Mamma Mia! The world-wide smash Mamma Mia! is a heartwarming and funny new musical. On the eve of a wedding, a mother and daughter are suprised by the arrival of three men, one of whom may be the girl's father. You don't have to be a fan of the supergroup ABBA, who provided the 23 hit songs for Mamma Mia! to fall in love with this unforgettable new show, that will have you dancing in the aisles!
The Winter Garden Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 1634 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan. Architect William Albert Swasey converted the former American Horse Exchange into a theatre for the Shuberts when they acquired the property. The fourth New York City venue to be christened the Winter Garden, it opened on March 10, 1911 with the early Jerome Kern musical La Belle Paree.
It was completely remodeled in 1922 by Herbert J. Krapp. The large stage is wider than those in most Broadway houses, and the proscenium arch is relatively low. The building is situated uniquely on its lot, with the main entrance and marquee, located on Broadway, connected to the 1530-seat Seventh Avenue auditorium via a long hallway, and the rear wall of the stage abutting 50th Street. Source
13
Brooklyn Academy of Music
  30 Lafayette Avenue - Brooklyn, NY              
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2013 Winter/Spring Season. Based on The Suit by Can Themba, Mothobi Mutloatse, and Barney Simon Direction, adaptation, and music by Peter Brook, Marie-Hélène Estienne, and Franck Krawczyk The renowned Peter Brook—whose 1987 production of The Mahabharata inaugurated the BAM Majestic Theater (now the BAM Harvey Theater)—returns with a music-filled adaptation of South African writer Can Themba’s piercing tale of simmering resentment and tragedy, The Suit. A wife caught in the act, her lover fleeing the scene, a suit left behind. It’s the perfect recipe for a husband’s punishing, humiliating decree: go on with business as usual, he says to his spouse, but take your lover’s suit everywhere you go as a ghostly reminder of your betrayal. Using an innovative staging that integrates live musicians directly into the action, Brook makes Themba’s volatile work sing. A hummed “Strange Fruit,” African melodies, and Schubert lieder thicken the tense, poisoned air of this apartheid-era summer in which a shared wound was not allowed to heal.
Dating from its first performance in 1861, BAM has grown into a thriving urban arts center that brings international performing arts and film to Brooklyn. The first BAM facility at 176-194 Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights was originally conceived by the Philharmonic Society of Brooklyn as a home for its concerts. It housed a large theater seating 2,200, a smaller concert hall, dressing and chorus rooms, and a vast "baronial" kitchen. BAM presented both amateur and professional music and theater productions. Performers included Ellen Terry, Edwin Booth, Tomas Salvini, and Fritz Kreisler.