New York City Theater

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Majestic Theatre, Manhattan

  247 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Playing in January 2013: The Phantom Of The Opera. Winner of 7 1988 Tony Awards including Best Musical, The Phantom of the Opera is based on the novel by Gaston Leroux. It tells the story of the hideously deformed Phantom who lurks beneath the stage of the Paris Opera, exercising a reign of terror over its occupants. The phantom falls in love with the young Soprano devoting himself to creating a new star for the Opera by nurturing her extraordinary talents and employing all the skills at his disposal.
The Majestic Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 245 West 44th Street in midtown Manhattan.
An earlier theatre with the same name had been located at 5 Columbus Circle, the present site of the Time-Warner building. Designed in 1903 by John Duncan, the architect of Grant's Tomb, the theatre hosted original musicals, including The Wizard of Oz and Babes in Toyland, and briefly served as a studio for NBC. It was renamed the Park Theatre in 1911 and demolished in 1954. Source
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St. James Theatre, Manhattan
  246 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Grammy® Award-winning superstar Barry Manilow returns to the Broadway stage for the first time in more than two decades! Don't miss this unprecedented limited engagement as one of our most beloved entertainers performs songs from his massive catalog of hits in an intimate setting at the St. James Theatre on Broadway. From “Mandy” to "I Write the Songs" to "Copacabana (At The Copa)" and so many more, Manilow’s new Broadway show is destined to be as legendary as the man himself.
The St. James Theatre is located at 246 W. 44th St. Broadway, New York City, New York. It was built by Abraham L. Erlanger, theatrical producer and a founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, on the site of the original Sardi's restaurant. It opened in 1927 as The Erlanger. Upon Erlanger's death in 1930, control of the venue was taken over by the Astor family, who owned the land on which the theatre stood. The Astors renamed it the St. James Theatre.
The theatre was purchased by the Shuberts in the late 1930s. They were forced to sell it to the William L. McKnight in 1957 following the loss of an antitrust case. McKnight renovated the St. James and reopened it in 1958. In 1970, McKnight then transferred the theatre to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger, who had formed the Jujamcyn Amusement Corporation. Source
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Broadway Theatre, Manhattan
  1681 Broadway - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Coming up: Rodgers And Hammerstein's Cinderella. Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is coming to Broadway for the first time ever! Four-time Tony Award nominee Douglas Carter Beane’s (Sister Act, Xanadu) delightfully romantic and hilarious take on the ultimate makeover story features all the classic elements you remember—the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more—plus some surprising new twists! Rediscover some of Rodgers + Hammerstein's most beloved songs, including “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It’s Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago" in this outrageously fun Broadway musical for dreamers of all ages. And not to worry... you'll be home well before the stroke of midnight!
The Broadway Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1681 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Eugene DeRosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day 1924 as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. It was re-named Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930 . (In 1937, known as Ciné Roma, it showed Italian films). The Shuberts bought it in 1939. It was renovated extensively in 1956 and 1986. The large stage (nearly sixty feet deep) and seating capacity (1761) have made it a popular theatre for musicals throughout the years.
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Richard Rodgers Theatre, Manhattan
  226 West 46th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
On Broadway through March 30th only. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.
Opened in 1924 and originally called the 46th Street Theatre, it was renamed in 1990 to honor the legendary composer Richard Rodgers, whose shows defined Broadway for over three decades. This theatres has been a house of hits hosting a long line of famed musicals including Anything Goes, Guys and Dolls, Damn Yankees, How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas; Nine, Chicago, and Movin' Out.
The theatre was refurbished in 2006 and houses The Richard Rodgers Gallery featuring historic memorabilia from its namesake's storied career.
The Richard Rodgers has 1,319 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization's nine Broadway theatres.
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Neil Simon Teatre, Manhattan
  250 West 52nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Since 1927, this theatre was known as the Alvin. It was renamed in 1983 to honor America’s most prolific playwright, Neil Simon, following the successful engagement of Brighton Beach Memoirs, the first play of an autobiographical trilogy about his youth with his family. Fittingly, in 1985, the second play of Mr. Simon’s trilogy, Biloxi Blues played there successfully. In 1992, Mr. Simon returned again with his play, Jake’s Women.
Since 2000, the Neil Simon has been filled with music and dancing as the home to two of Broadway’s most popular productions, namely the acclaimed revival of The Music Man and, currently, the Tony Award®-winning Best Musical, Hairspray.
The Neil Simon Theatre has 1,445 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.
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Palace Theater, Manhattan
  Broadway and 47th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Palace Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1564 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architects Kirchoff & Rose, the theatre, built by California vaudeville entrepreneur and Broadway impresario Martin Beck, experienced a number of problems before it opened. E. F. Albee, one of the main executives for B. F. Keith and his powerful vaudeville circuit, demanded that Beck turn over three-quarters of the stock in the theatre in order to use acts from the Keith circuit. In addition, Oscar Hammerstein was the only person who could offer Keith acts in that section of Broadway, so Beck paid him off with $225,000. The theatre finally opened on March 24, 1913 with headliner Ed Wynn. To "play the Palace" meant that an entertainer had reached the pinnacle of his career, and it became a popular venue with performers like Sarah Bernhardt, Eddie Cantor, Bob Hope, Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker, George Jessel, and Jack Benny. Source
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New Amsterdam Theatre, Manhattan
  Broadway & 42nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Based on P.I. Travers cherished stories and the classic 1964 Walt Disney film, Mary Poppins features the Sherman brothers original Academy Award-winning songs. The show has been created, in collaboration with Cameron Mackintosh, by Academy Award-winning screenwriter Julian Fellowes, who has written the book, and the Olivier Award-winning team of George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, who have composed new songs and additional music and lyrics.
Olivier Award-winning director Richard Lyre leads a dream team of vision and stagecraft bringing to life the story of the Banks family and their magical nanny. Co-direction and choreography is by Olivier Award-winner Matthew Bourne, set and costume design is by Tony Award winner Bob Crowley, co-choreography is by Olivier Award-winner Stephen Mear, and lighting design is by Olivier Award-winner Howard Harrison.
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Booth Theatre, Manhattan
  222 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Booth Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York City.
The venue was the second New York City theatre to bear this name. The first was built by Booth himself in 1869 on the corner of 23rd Street and 6th Avenue.
The Booth Theatre appeared in the West Wing episode Posse Comitatus. It hosted a fictitous charity performance of War of the Roses which an equally fictitious President Bartlett attended while pondering the planned assassination of the Quamari Defence Minister. Source
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Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Manhattan
  242 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. John Golden leased and renamed the theatre for himself from 1932 to 1937, when the Shubert Organization assumed ownership and leased the theater to CBS Radio until 1940, when it was restored to its original use and name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs. Source
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Beacon Theatre, Manhattan
  2124 Broadway - New York, NY              
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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, Lynyrd Skynyrd continues to make music and rock stages. Don't miss this legendary band at The Beacon Theatre on January 15!
The Beacon Theatre is the "older sister" to Radio City Music Hall. Both legendary venues were the "brainchild" of Samuel "Roxy" Rothafel, the great theatrical impresario and visionary of his time.
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American Airlines Theatre, Manhattan
  227 West 42nd Street - New York, NY              
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A permanent home has long been a dream for the Roundabout Theatre Company. Since its establishment in 1965, Roundabout had moved from location to location, always searching for the next stop in what seemed to be a never-ending journey for permanency. From West 26th Street to West 23rd Street, from East 17th Street at Union Square then on to the Criterion Center, Roundabout seemed destined to live up to its name far too literally. All that changed in 1997, when The New 42nd Street Development project, backed by the City and State of New York, offered the historic Selwyn Theatre to Roundabout.
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St.George Theatre
  35 Hyatt Street (2 blocks from the ferry) - Staten Island, NY              
The magnificent St. George Theatre shines once again and serves Staten Island and all of New York. By polishing this treasured jewel, the integrity of its' unique structure will be maintained and a major boost will be given to the revitalization efforts of this North Shore community. It serves as a cultural arts center for a myriad of activities including outreach educational programs, architectural tours, television and film shoots, concerts, comedy, Broadway touring companies, children's shows and many local community events and performances.
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Brooklyn Academy of Music
  30 Lafayette Avenue - Brooklyn, NY              
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2013 Winter/Spring Season. Based on The Suit by Can Themba, Mothobi Mutloatse, and Barney Simon Direction, adaptation, and music by Peter Brook, Marie-Hélène Estienne, and Franck Krawczyk The renowned Peter Brook—whose 1987 production of The Mahabharata inaugurated the BAM Majestic Theater (now the BAM Harvey Theater)—returns with a music-filled adaptation of South African writer Can Themba’s piercing tale of simmering resentment and tragedy, The Suit. A wife caught in the act, her lover fleeing the scene, a suit left behind. It’s the perfect recipe for a husband’s punishing, humiliating decree: go on with business as usual, he says to his spouse, but take your lover’s suit everywhere you go as a ghostly reminder of your betrayal. Using an innovative staging that integrates live musicians directly into the action, Brook makes Themba’s volatile work sing. A hummed “Strange Fruit,” African melodies, and Schubert lieder thicken the tense, poisoned air of this apartheid-era summer in which a shared wound was not allowed to heal.
Dating from its first performance in 1861, BAM has grown into a thriving urban arts center that brings international performing arts and film to Brooklyn. The first BAM facility at 176-194 Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights was originally conceived by the Philharmonic Society of Brooklyn as a home for its concerts. It housed a large theater seating 2,200, a smaller concert hall, dressing and chorus rooms, and a vast "baronial" kitchen. BAM presented both amateur and professional music and theater productions. Performers included Ellen Terry, Edwin Booth, Tomas Salvini, and Fritz Kreisler.